Chapter Seven: Secrets to a Brighter Smile | New York, NY

Because we cannot escape the constant presence of the “selfie”, having a great smile is key to looking your best. Unfortunately, most of us do not have the whitest teeth possible. This is likely due to some type of lifestyle choices we are making, both good or bad. Bad habits like smoking are obviously hurting the shade of your teeth but taking certain prescriptions can also cause some coloration damage. The good news is that we can do something about brightening our smile, from basic dietary changes to a professional treatment session. Simple changes to our lifestyle can not only improve our dental health, but our overall health as well.

In this chapter, Dr. Larry Rosenthal shows us some tips to keeping our smiles as bright as we can. We present “Doctor Larry’s Guide to Whitening”…

  • Use a straw when drinking dark-colored, carbonated, or acidic beverages
  • Eat detergent foods high in roughage that stimulate saliva flow
  • Brush after every meal with a soft toothbrush or electric toothbrush
  • Cut out sugary beverages or limit them to mealtime
  • Floss daily or use an oral irrigator
  • Use toothpastes and mouthwashes with fluoride whitening agents
  • Change your toothbrush every month or two, tops
  • Get your teeth professionally whitened no more than once a year
  • Ask your dentist about using home whitening products between professional sessions
  • Use bleaching agents in moderation

To learn more about the visual guide to a smile, get your copy of Open Wider from Amazon.com today!

If you are interested in dental college courses, contact Aesthetic Advantage at 212-794-3552 to register today! Or visit www.aestheticadvantage.com for additional information.

Aesthetic Advantage proudly serves New York, Atlanta, Florida, Chicago, Pennsylvania, Boston, Rhode Island, California, South Carolina, North Carolina and all surrounding areas.

Chapter 20: Competence, Confidence, and Control | New York, NY

When a patient looks for a new dental professional, oftentimes they don’t exactly know what they are looking for. Each has a specific need and requirement but choosing the correct fit can be daunting and overwhelming. They all want to be taken care of properly, but because it is difficult to know if this is possible, they tend to choose the most confident dentist.

As a dental professional, it’s important to realize that we walk a fine line between confidence and cocky, so it is important to be up front and honest about your capabilities. Don’t mislead your patients into thinking you can do a certain procedure if you are unfamiliar. Claiming you are confident in things you haven’t experienced much of will only affect their experiences with you.

It is also important to be able to pivot, as no two patients are alike. There are always basics to follow, but not all smiles can be treated the same. Be able to change treatment options to suit the patient and be confident enough to tell a patient a certain treatment option isn’t the right one for them. If you aren’t the dental professional for them, tell them. Patients need to feel a sense on control in a scary situation, so have the confidence to be able to present what you can confidently provide to your patients. Let them be a part of the process. Tell them what to expect and answer any questions they have with certain facts and calming poise.

In addition, having a confident, capable staff is just as important as how you present yourself. Pick your dream team, make each other the best and give your patients an experience that will keep them coming back.

Chapter Six: Three Levels of Care | New York, NY

As a dental professional we walk a fine line with our patients that know exactly “what they need” and cannot be convinced otherwise, and patients that have no clue what they need because all they know if that it hurts or is ugly and would like it fixed. The former is a much tougher patient because they will insist upon treatment options that may not be the best for them because “someone told them about this particular option”, and their teeth look fantastic. It is our job to figure out a way to convince them that they can trust you enough to know what is best for their smile. And it all comes down to three levels of care – where health equals beauty.

Level one: oral health care and maintenance. Our mouths are the first line of defense for many of the illnesses and infections we encounter in our lives. And in order to keep ourselves healthy, it is important to maintain a proper level of dental hygiene and maintenance in order to keep our bodies running. Proper daily dental hygiene routine and consistent checkups will ensure that this happens.

Level two: restorative care. When it comes to restorations, it is important to discuss five key points: comfort (how the restoration feels), convenience (how long the procedure takes), durability (how long it will last with proper upkeep), affordability (and if it fits within budget) and appearance (how they feel mentally).

Level three: aesthetic care. When discussing dental treatment options, it is also important to give aesthetic options as well. The color, size and shape of the teeth themselves, how much are visible when in use and their improved overall appearance.

To learn more about a visual guide to the smile, get your copy of Open Wider from Amazon.com today!

If you are interested in dental college courses, contact Aesthetic Advantage at 212-794-3552 to register today! Or visit www.aestheticadvantage.com for additional information.

Aesthetic Advantage proudly serves New York, Atlanta, Florida, Chicago, Pennsylvania, Boston, Rhode Island, California, South Carolina, North Carolina and all surrounding areas.